Thursday, November 9, 2017

Njabulo Ndlovu, the SA hero of the 2017 Danone Nations Cup world finals in the USA





Mophela Primary School represented South Africa at the 2017 Danone Nations Cup World Final soccer tournament in New York last month and, although the team finished 27th out of the 32 teams competing – it was a life-changing experience for the boys involved, and for one player in particular, Njabulo Ndlovu.  The trip to the USA showed that he can hold his head high and compete with distinction against the top players of his generation.

Njabulo Ndlovu rose to the challenge and made the most of the opportunity he was given. He proved to be versatile and able to play in any position, and was not intimidated by players who were physically bigger and stronger than him, some of whom played for the youth academies of Europe’s most famous clubs. Germany was represented by the youth team from RB Leipzig FC and ended in 5th position and the under-12 team from Atletico Madrid represented Spain finishing in 9th position.  The tournament was won by Mexico.

New York and the Danone Nations Cup World Finals were on a different planet for Njabulo. Mophelo Primary School is in the tiny KwaZulu-Natal rural village of Hammarsdale, and Njabulo lives in an orphanage.

He moved into the Lily of the Valley children’s home two years ago after living, along with 17 others, in a single-room dwelling, all surviving on his grandmother’s social welfare pension.

At Lily of the Valley he shares a room with Sanele Dlamini who attends Gabigabi High School and prefers choir to soccer. Njabulo looks up to Sanele as a big brother and Sanele has been very influential, always encouraging him, and helping him with his schoolwork.

At the orphanage he gets three square meals a day, and he has learned to speak English – which was an advantage at the tournament in New York. He has also come into contact with international visitors who volunteer to work there.

Going to the USA was exciting, and he knew something of what to expect, having been prepared by Laura Everett, an American volunteer who helped him with his English and taught him some life skills.

“I’d like to return to the USA one day and I would like to play soccer in Europe,” Njabulo said. “The USA changed my way of thinking. I’m from a very rural area, but now I know I can go out and improve myself and come back and improve the village I live in. I know I’ll need to work hard and do well at school to do that.”

Njabulo’s team mates struggled to adapt to the food they were given in New York. They are used to a diet of mealie meal porridge, and they didn’t get that there. At the orphanage they grow their own vegetables and Njabulo is used to a varied diet, so he loved the meals they received.

Njabulo has been identified by the scouts from AmaZulu FC and can’t wait for next year when he will be with them on a more permanent basis. He is working on his English, hoping they will send him to Glenwood Boys’ High next year.

One day he would like to become a teacher. “I want to come back to the village and make a major impact in changing the environment there to improve the entire village,” he said.

For Njabulo the highlights of going to the world finals were playing on great surfaces and meeting players from other countries. With his stylish play, and ability to speak English, he was a popular tourist.

Jetlag and adjusting to a different time zone affected the team badly, he said. “In the first days we had no energy, so we made a slow start.”

The big Indonesian team, with their direct passing game and movement off the ball were their toughest opponents, Njabulo said, while England – who they beat twice – were the friendliest team, and the nicest to hang out with.

The best team to watch, according to Njabulo, was Spain. “I loved the way they would pass the ball to each other and how well they communicated on the field,” he said.  But then what else can you expect from Atletico Madrid’s development team.

Team captain, Kwanda Zungu, played a crucial role, Njabulo said. “He was the funniest one, and he was always positive. When we were feeling low after losing, he managed to motivate the team, he had us laughing and back on track again, ready for the next match.

“He kept reminded us that just being in the USA was a major achievement,” said Njabulo.  “We were playing in an international arena against the best under-12 teams, and we come from a poor rural area with no football field so we were at a disadvantage.”

The key lesson for Njabulo was not to focus on the negative but to be positive and learn something new every day. “Of course we would have loved to have done better, but it is not just about winning. It’s about improving oneself and learning as well.  We are the luckiest under-12 footballers in South Africa!  I just cannot thank Danone Southern Africa enough for creating such an opportunity for us.  It sure was a dream come true.”





Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Registration opens for the 2018 Danone Nations Cup










Registration for the 2018 edition of the largest soccer tournament in the world for kids between 10 and 12 years is open. Schools across the country are invited to become part of the Danone Nations Cup, which touches the lives of over 2 million people annually.

2018 will be the 19th edition of the tournament, which is the brain child of Danone, the biggest global producer of dairy products.  South Africa has been participating in the tournament since its inception and has won the world title three times: in 2003, 2007 and 2009.

The tournament is run in partnership with the South African Schools Football Association (SASFA) and it comprises games beginning at cluster level, with winning schools progressing to regional and then provincial levels, culminating in the national finals where the national champion team that will represent the country at the Danone Nations Cup World Finals is identified.

Last year, over 2 700 schools registered to play in the initial rounds of the tournament, which is the most to have registered in the history of the tournament in this country.

In 2017, for the first time, schools belonging to the Johannesburg Primary Schools Football Association joined the tournament. They hosted their own final with Reddam House of Bedfordview, beating King David Sandton and going on to compete in the Gauteng provincial finals. The number of schools from the association is expected to grow substantially in 2018.

Among the schools who are expected to be the first to enter are Benny’s Sports Development and Academy from Limpopo (2016 national champions) and the defending champions, Mophela Primary School from KwaZulu-Natal.  The former school, under coach Mbishi Mokwena, has already started preparing their team.

The basis on which the competing nations decide on their champion team differs from country to country. In South Africa it is an inter-school competition. Other countries send their top club youth sides or academy teams, whilst others select regional or even national teams at under-12 level.

The Danone Nations Cup is built on fundamental principles: participation, friendship, accessibility and fair play. The message is to believe in your dreams and to promote healthy living through sport to as many people as possible in the world.

The eventual 2018 South African national champion team will be going to the Danone Nations Cup World Finals at a venue still to be decided.

To register for the tournament please contact Themba Tshabalala at SASFA:




Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Young Cricketers on the Fast Track to Stardom



The Audi Q5 Fast Track, South Africa’s first cricket development initiative designed to utilise state-of-the-art technology to identify bowling talent, held its national final this week at the Clifton Oval in Cape Town.  The final included Proteas players who were on hand to scout for the next fast bowling stars and brought together 24 of the best young bowlers from around the country. The aim of the day was to allow standout young bowlers to showcase their talent in front of Cricket South Africa’s (CSA) development team.  Gerhardus Fourie from Limpopo and Constance Sardick from Gauteng emerged as winners in the day, recognising their all-round bowling skills.

Sardick, who experienced her first trip to Cape Town, said “The Audi Q5 Fast Track final was definitely one of the most exciting experiences of my life.  Not only did I get to experience the amazing technology of the Audi Bowling Lab or have the opportunity to show my talent in front of Cricket South Africa but I also got to meet my heroes and experience Cape Town for the first time.”

The Audi Q5 Fast Track initiative, in collaboration with CSA, was conceived with the aim of utilising the Audi Bowling Lab (a set-up which uses world-leading Pitchvision technology to assess a bowler’s action, line, length and speed) to identify young bowling talent in untapped rural areas.  It has since visited Gauteng, Eastern Cape, Kwa-Zulu Natal, Limpopo and Western Cape.  Former Protea fast bowler, Mfuneko Ngam, served as the lead talent scout and was directly involved in selecting standout bowlers in each region who would ultimately make it through to the national final.      

Ngam commented, “The Audi Q5 Fast Track was one of the most eye-opening experiences of my career. Audi has helped us to realise the depth of bowling talent that exists across our country – something which makes me very hopeful for the future of South African cricket.”

On the day of the final, the young bowlers were put through their paces by what was undoubtedly the foremost scouting team ever assembled in South African cricket.  The team included: Corrie van Zyl (General Manager: CSA); David Mokopanele (Director: Mass Participation); Victor Mpitsang (SA u19 Convenor of Selectors); , Ottis Gibson and Hilton Moreeng (Proteas national coaches); Kagiso Rabada, Dale Steyn, Andile Phehlukwayo, Dane Paterson, Dwayne Pretorius and Shabnim Ismail (current Proteas). The scouting team took the boys and girls through a series of training sessions and motivational talks before assessing their bowling potential using the Audi Bowling Lab.

“I was immensely impressed by the level of talent we witnessed here today,” commented Ottis Gibson, Proteas Head Coach.

“Having come from a fast bowling background I am very excited about this initiative and to have been a part of it.  South Africa has a great fast bowling tradition, my hope is that one of the young bowlers we witnessed here today will continue that legacy in the future,” he added. 

The national final sees the culmination of the 2017 edition of the Audi Q5 Fast Track with all those involved in the program holding high hopes for the talent uncovered around South Africa.

“In conducting this initiative, we hope that we have not only provided opportunities to individuals who may never have had the chance to show their skills but that we have also broadened the talent pool for CSA to develop their next crop of Protea bowlers.  As a Progressive Partner to the Proteas, Audi is proud to have utilised our resources to drive progress for South African youth within sport development.” concluded Trevor Hill, Head of Audi South Africa.

For more information on the Audi Q5 Fast Track go to https://nowiscalling.co.za/fast-track.